5 - Throws

CHAPTER 5

THROWS

This chapter describes all techniques for a right-handed person. However, all techniques can be executed from either side.

The Marine is depicted in camouflage utilities. The opponent is depicted without camouflage.

Marines use throwing techniques to maintain the tactical advantage and to throw the opponent to the ground during close combat. Throws apply the principles of balance, leverage, timing, and body position to upset an opponent’s balance and to gain control by forcing the opponent to the ground. Throwing techniques are effective because they are size- and gender-neutral, and they rely on the momentum and power generated by the opponent rather than the strength or size of the Marine. Marines also execute a throw as a devastating attack against an opponent, possibly causing unconsciousness or broken limbs. When Marines execute throws, they must maintain balance and, simultaneously, prevent the opponent from countering a throw or escaping after being forced to the ground.

1. Turning Throw

Marines use a turning throw to take the opponent to the ground while they remain standing. A turning throw can also be executed from a stationary position. It is particularly effective if Marines and the opponent are wearing gear. To execute the turning throw, Marines—

Grasp the opponent’s right wrist with the left hand.


Step forward with the right foot, place it against

the outside of the opponent’s right foot, and pivot so the back of the heel is next to the middle of the opponent’s foot.


Hook the opponent’s right arm with the right arm and pinch his arm between the biceps and forearm, touching the opponent with the body.

Pull the opponent’s wrist downward, keeping it close to the body. Pivot to the left on the ball of the foot and continue pulling downward on the opponent’s wrist while rotating the wrist outward to off-balance him.


2. Hip Throw

Marines use a hip throw to take the opponent to the ground while they remain standing. A hip throw is particularly effective if the opponent is moving forward or pushing. Marines use the opponent’s forward momentum to execute the hip throw. To execute the hip throw, Marines—

Grasp the opponent’s right wrist with the left hand.


Step forward with the right foot and place it against the outside of the opponent’s right foot.


The back of the heel should be next to the opponent’s foot.

Step back with the left foot and rotate on the ball of the foot. The back of the heel is next to the opponent’s toe. The knees are bent.

Rotate at the waist and hook the right hand around

the back of the opponent’s body (anywhere from his waist to his head). The side and hip should be against the opponent.


Rotate the hip against the opponent. The hips must be lower than the opponent’s.

Use the right hand to pull the opponent up on the hip to maximize contact.

Pull the opponent’s arm across the body and, at the same time, lift the opponent off the ground slightly by bending at the waist, straightening the legs, and rotating the body to the left.

sweep is particularly effective if the opponent is already off-balanced and moving backward or pulling on the Marine. To execute the leg sweep, Marines— Grab the opponent’s right wrist with the left hand and grab the opponent’s left shoulder with the right hand.



Note: Grab the opponent’s clothing or gear if his wrist and shoulder cannot be grabbed.

Step forward with the left foot and place it on the outside of the opponent’s right foot. Pull the opponent’s wrist downward, close to the body, and push his shoulder backward to off-balance him.


3. Leg Sweep

Raise the right knee no higher than the waist.

Marines use a leg sweep to take the opponent to the ground while they remain standing. A leg Kick the foot past the opponent’s right leg.



MCRP 3-02B

Use the heel of the boot to make contact with the opponent’s calf (anywhere from the top of the calf down to the Achilles tendon or on the inside of the calf).

Sweep the opponent to the ground.